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Wreath laying ceremonies take place across Suffolk as Royal British Legion marks 100 years



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Ceremonies have taken place across Suffolk as the Royal British Legion (RBL) celebrated its centenary today.

Wreaths were laid at a war memorial in Bury St Edmunds, whilst silhouettes of soldiers were displayed outside a Church in Bacton – to mark 100 years since the charity was founded.

Bernie Millard, chairman of the Bury St Edmunds branch of the RBL, led the ceremony this morning as wreaths were placed at the cenotaph in Angel Hill.

Bob Ewington lays a wreath at the cenotaph in Angel Hill. Picture: Mecha Morton.
Bob Ewington lays a wreath at the cenotaph in Angel Hill. Picture: Mecha Morton.

Around a dozen people attended the small-scale event. With social distancing measures still in place, onlookers had to stand at a safe distance, as The Last Post was performed by local schoolgirl Imogen Forman.

Imogen Forman performs The Last Post. Picture: Mecha Morton.
Imogen Forman performs The Last Post. Picture: Mecha Morton.

Over in Bacton, the branch of the RBL teamed up with the parish council to launch a new memorial garden and put silhouettes representing the men lost in both world wars on display.

The branch had come up with the idea for a garden of reflection in the village, and will plant their first tree today.

Gareth Mutimer, of Bacton, has designed made the 28 silhouettes representing the men lost from the village in both the first and second world wars.

Members of Bacon Parish Council and Royal British Legion hold a service as they plant a tree to mark 100 years of the RBL. Picture: Mecha Morton.
Members of Bacon Parish Council and Royal British Legion hold a service as they plant a tree to mark 100 years of the RBL. Picture: Mecha Morton.

Over the course of the weekend, villagers are coming out to help put the soldiers on display on the village green.

Peter Gipson, who has been secretary for the RBL Bacton Branch since the late 90's, when asked why it was important to commemorate the fallen soldiers, said: "Because the legion has over its entire history worked to help people who have suffered in war.

He added: "It's suitable with the number of soldiers that we lost in two wars.

28 silhouettes, representing soldiers from Bacton that died in WW1 and WW2. Picture: Mecha Morton.
28 silhouettes, representing soldiers from Bacton that died in WW1 and WW2. Picture: Mecha Morton.

"Our village was quite small, it was something like 2,000 people and to lose 28 young men needs remembering."

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