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Birmingham 2022 Queen's Baton Relay to pass through Abbey Gardens in Bury St Edmunds marking Platinum Jubilee and Commonwealth Games



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A baton relay marking the Queen's Jubilee and Commonwealth Games is to pass through Bury St Edmunds, it has been announced.

The Birmingham 2022 Queen's Baton Relay will visit the town on Saturday, July 9 as part of its final journey through England, passing through The Abbey Gardens at 2.30pm.

The baton is set to head across England for 29 days in total, before ending up at the Commonwealth Games opening ceremony in Birmingham, on July 28.

The baton has already begun its epic journey across the Commonwealth, where it will have visited Europe, Africa, Asia, Oceania, the Caribbean, and the Americas before arriving in England.

By passing through Bury, the baton will also be visiting the Festival of Suffolk Community Games as well.

The Festival of Suffolk is a series of events marking the Queen's Jubilee.

A baton relay marking the Queen's Jubilee and Commonwealth Games is to visit Bury St Edmunds on July 9 it has been announced.
A baton relay marking the Queen's Jubilee and Commonwealth Games is to visit Bury St Edmunds on July 9 it has been announced.

David Sheepshanks CBE DL, one of the directors of the Festival of Suffolk and Chair of the Community Games organising committee, said it was an 'honour' for the baton relay to be visiting Bury.

Meanwhile, Cllr John Griffiths, leader of West Suffolk Council, said it was a 'delight' it was passing through the town.

"On behalf of our historic town, I look forward to welcoming visitors and residents alike, to share the moment and take home cherished memories," he said.

As part of the baton relay, thousands of batonbearers, each with inspiring backgrounds and stories, will have the honour of carrying it during its journey through England, including those nominated in recognition of their contributions to their community, whether that be in sport, education, the arts, culture or charity.

Parasport athlete Kadeena Cox receiving the baton from The Queen at the Queen's Baton Relay launch.
Parasport athlete Kadeena Cox receiving the baton from The Queen at the Queen's Baton Relay launch.

Between 40 and 130 batonbearers will carry the baton each day, with the relay reaching hundreds of villages, towns and cities during its tour of the country.

Travelling via land, air and sea, more than 180 communities in England will experience the Queen’s baton on a route spanning 2,500 miles.

Phil Batty, director of Ceremonies, Culture and Queen's Baton Relay, said: “Whilst the baton has been travelling across the Commonwealth, we have worked closely with local authorities in England to devise a route that engages with hundreds of communities, passing sport venues, historic sites, local schools and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

"Yet the Queen’s Baton Relay is far more than just a journey.

"It symbolises connecting people from every corner of the Commonwealth, celebrates batonbearers who take on challenges, and marks the countdown to the biggest sporting event in West Midlands history.

"And by the time the baton returns to England for the final leg, 71 nations and territories will have already experienced the magic that comes with it.

"We hope that communities across the country join the excitement, attend events near them, line the streets to cheer on our incredible batonbearers and celebrate the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games."

The Queen's Baton Relay has been a tradition for the Commonwealth Games since its inaugural appearance at the Cardiff 1958 Commonwealth Games.