Home   Bury St Edmunds   News   Article

Subscribe Now

Bury St Edmunds Nostalgia - King Edward VI grammar school marks last Founder's Day service with rose-giving tradition



More news, no ads

LEARN MORE


In today's nostalgia we look back to when everything came up roses for 12-year-old Joanna Day in June 1972.

She was given a single red rose on a velvet cushion by Brian Dow, head boy of King Edward VI grammar school in Bury St Edmunds at the Founder’s Day service at the cathedral.

That September the grammar school was to go comprehensive and amalgamate the Silver Jubilee schools for girls and boys, and Breckland secondary school - making one big school of 1,400 pupils.

In today's nostalgia we go back to when everything came up roses for 12-year-old Joanna Day in June 1972
In today's nostalgia we go back to when everything came up roses for 12-year-old Joanna Day in June 1972

The rose was given to Joanna because she would be the youngest pupil in the next school year and was a symbol of confidence that the traditions of the 422-year-old school would be maintained and enhanced.

But Joanna had no time to reflect on the occasion as she was whisked straight back to school to sit an exam she missed the week before.

The Founder's Day service, a long tradition at the school, was the last of its kind to be held.

The school was founded on August 3, 1550, by King Edward VI. The following term the buildings would house a middle school.

The new upper school would use the buildings on the Silver Jubilee schools.