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Abbey Gardens in Bury St Edmunds affected by record-breaking heatwave



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The recent heatwave has had a significant impact on the grass areas in the Abbey Gardens in Bury St Edmunds, with a council saying they are 'heeding advice to be prudent with water use'.

Aerial photos taken of the park's bowling green, compared with pictures taken in February 2020, highlight how the ongoing dry spell has affected the previously healthy, green grass.

A spokeswoman for West Suffolk Council, said: "We recognise the importance of the park for visitors, local economy and health and wellbeing of residents and we take pride in presenting it to the best standards possible.

"We do not habitually water grass in our parks and open spaces and are we heeding advice to be prudent with water use."

The spokeswoman said that as part of the councils work to be more environmentally friendly, they have been using 'grey water' to water hanging baskets and added water retentive gel in the flower planting.

Grey water, is recycled water often from sinks, kitchens, washing machines, showers and baths.

An aerial shot of the bowling green area in the Abbey Gardens taken in February 2020. Picture by Mark Westley
An aerial shot of the bowling green area in the Abbey Gardens taken in February 2020. Picture by Mark Westley
Photographs taken in August 2022 show the bowling green has been badly affected by the recent heatwave. Picture: Submitted
Photographs taken in August 2022 show the bowling green has been badly affected by the recent heatwave. Picture: Submitted
The grounds of the Abbey Gardens taken in February 2020, including the historic Abbey ruins. Picture: Mark Westley
The grounds of the Abbey Gardens taken in February 2020, including the historic Abbey ruins. Picture: Mark Westley
Aerial photographs taken in August 2022 show the impact the heatwave has had on the grounds of the historic Abbey Gardens. Picture: Submitted
Aerial photographs taken in August 2022 show the impact the heatwave has had on the grounds of the historic Abbey Gardens. Picture: Submitted

The spokeswoman added: "We would expect the grass to come back into growth once the extreme heat and lack of rainfall are over and we are monitoring the situation."

Earlier this week Anglian Water said they do not plan to introduce a hosepipe ban in Suffolk.

The company who control Suffolk's water supply say reservoir levels are currently stable.