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Wickhambrook resident criticises Suffolk Highways for failing to cut back hedge which he has reported multiple times since 2018



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An overgrown hedge is likely to cause a serious accident, according to one resident in a Suffolk village.

Robin Cooper, of Thorns Close, Wickhambrook, lives opposite the hedge in question, which has grown to 20ft high in some areas.

The hedge overlooks the bowls club and recreation ground, and as a result of its height, prevents Mr Cooper from looking out into the recreation ground.

Robin with Linda Halls. Picture by Mark Westley.
Robin with Linda Halls. Picture by Mark Westley.

Documents suggest that Suffolk Highways own the outside of the hedge, towards the road, while Wickhambrook Parish Council owns the inside of the hedge towards the bowls club.

Robin said: “The issue is that they have said they would cut twice a year. This is going back about 10 years and they have failed to do it.

“From 2018 I have had a contact number which they gave you to say they would come and do the hedge.

Robin Cooper has complained to Suffolk Highways about an overgrown edge that is outside the front of his property. Picture by Mark Westley.
Robin Cooper has complained to Suffolk Highways about an overgrown edge that is outside the front of his property. Picture by Mark Westley.

“It is nearly reaching four foot wide, but now one is coming up to 20 foot high and one end is 15 foot high.”

The hedge on Thorns Close is near to Wickhambrook Primary Academy, and is frequented by school children on their way to and from school. As it stretches three feet out into the road, children and pedestrians are being forced further into the road. This could lead to a serious accident if it is not cut back, according to Mr Cooper.

“On the letter I said someone is going to get hurt or killed,” he added.

“I have had trouble with it for years. The hedge has been allowed to grow away from where it should be.”

A spokesperson for Suffolk Highways said: “We’re aware of the overgrown vegetation at this location and can confirm that our Operations team are assessing the maintenance required.

“While we appreciate that the hedge in question is not aesthetically pleasing, it is not considered to require urgent attention and will therefore be prioritised against other safety critical work accordingly.”