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Jobfished: Suffolk man speaks of experience working for fake design agency in BBC documentary



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A Suffolk man who worked for a fake design agency which duped its staff into believing it was a real company has spoken of his experience on a BBC documentary.

Jordan Carter, 26, worked for Madbird for six months from 2020 into the following year.

He was one of the hardest working members of his sales team, at one stage receiving an Employee of the Month award.

Jordan Carter in the Jobfished documentary. Picture: BBC.
Jordan Carter in the Jobfished documentary. Picture: BBC.

But what he did not know was the company was not real, and even some employees were made up.

The revelations come in a documentary 'Jobfished', which aired on BBC Three last night.

In the documentary, presented by investigative journalist Catrin Nye, viewers see and hear about how the company's creative director, Ali Ayad, made up fake profiles for staff members, and allegedly stole work from other established creative agencies.

The documentary was presented and narrated by investigative journalist Catrin Nye. Picture: BBC.
The documentary was presented and narrated by investigative journalist Catrin Nye. Picture: BBC.

When asked in the documentary how he felt upon finding out Madbird was fake, Jordan said: "It was tough to be honest. I wanted to apologise to everyone on LinkedIn that I spoke to.

"Like 3,000 people I've connected with on LinkedIn about something that's not even real, and trying to get money out of them really."

He added: "In my head at the time, I was like 'I've wasted six months where minimum wage would've got me over eight grand', and I got nothing."

Jordan said he gave up a paid position to go to the commission-only role at Madbird.

The documentary aired on BBC Three last night. Picture: BBC.
The documentary aired on BBC Three last night. Picture: BBC.

"I worked there for nearly six months and I think I contacted over 10,000 people," he said.

"People in Switzerland, Dubai, France, loads in the UK, Australia."

The documentary ends with Nye confronting Ali Ayad in the street and asking him to apologise to the people he employed.