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These are the heritage sites across Suffolk that are 'at risk' according to Historic England




People irked about being stuck in the UK rather than having been able to go abroad this summer might have realised there is plenty to do and see in Suffolk .

The county is known for Roman and Anglo-Saxon archaeology and its picturesque villages such as Lavenham and Somerleyton.

But are there places you might not be able to go to some time in the near future? Places that are badly in need of restoration and repair if they are to survive?

Bungay's town sign.
Bungay's town sign.

Bungay Castle in Bungay is a medieval castle which was built by Roger Bigod of Norfolk around 1100.

The Bigod family were a powerful Norman family who assisted King William with the conquest of England in 1066, and as a reward for their support, were granted the castle.

Today, the castle is a Grade I listed building, but it is in desperate need of repair – according to Historic England's website, there is immediate risk of further rapid deterioration, and a survey is being prepared to gauge what next steps will be.

Moreton Hall Preparatory School, Bury St Edmunds.	Picture by Mark Westley.
Moreton Hall Preparatory School, Bury St Edmunds. Picture by Mark Westley.

Moreton Hall is a Grade II listed building in Bury St Edmunds . It was designed by the architect Robert Adam and built in 1773 as a country house for John Symonds, a clergyman and Professor of Modern History at Cambridge University.

The building has shared multiple names in its time, including 'St Edmund's Hill' and 'The Mount' before agreeing on Moreton Hall in 1890, its name today.

From 1962 the building and surrounding beautiful 30 acres was used by the Moreton Hall Preparatory School.

But, according to Historic England's website, the building is in need of 'high-level repairs to the exterior' and there are signs of 'slow decay.'

Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club's iconic Martello Tower.
Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club's iconic Martello Tower.

The Martello Tower on the Felixstowe Golf Course forms part of a chain of Martello towers along the south and east coast of England dating from the early 19th century.

They were used as part of defences against possible Napoleonic invasion but is one of many towers along the English coastline which has fallen into disrepair.

The roof and walls of the tower are in very poor condition after water penetration issues and Historic England is in discussion with the owner over repairs.

The entrance to Stoke College in Stoke by Clare.
The entrance to Stoke College in Stoke by Clare.

Stoke College, in Stoke-by-Clare, is a Grade II listed building. It was originally a Benedictine convent which was converted into a college and then mansion after the Dissolution.

It is currently a co-educational day school for children aged 3 to 18, but repairs are required to the roof and other areas of the building.

The Church of St Margaret has had restoration issues for decades.	Photo provided by Historic England.
The Church of St Margaret has had restoration issues for decades. Photo provided by Historic England.

The Church of St Margaret in Brampton with Stoven is a parish church that has had restoration issues for decades, including in 1987, when the tiny parish was presented with a giant £200,000 bill for repairs of the church.

Funding bodies and charities including English Heritage were unable to help at the time as the building was not considered important enough for injections of cash.

Since then, the church has been upgraded to a Grade II listing and funding estimates to make repairs were lower than expected, however, the repairs still need to be made.

The lower portion of the tower is possibly medieval and the remainder was entirely rebuilt in the mid 19th century in neo-Norman style, however that reconstruction work has resulted in 'serious structural failures in masonry', particularly the south nave wall. Water penetration is also an issue due to a poorly constructed roof.

The Bishop of Dunwich visited Stuston parish Church.	Picture: Mark Bullimore Photography.
The Bishop of Dunwich visited Stuston parish Church. Picture: Mark Bullimore Photography.

The Church of All Saints in Stuston has a 12th to 13th century round flint tower with an octagonal 14th century Belfry - the part of a bell tower or steeple in which bells are housed – stage.

The chancel and porch were rebuilt in the 15th century and the large north vestry was added around 1860-2.

The tower was repaired and windows altered in 1877 however there is currently structural movement and cracking to the tower, which is cordoned off.

Rainwater has caused damage and created structural movement in the chancel – the part of the church near the altar reserved for the clergy and choir.

A National Lottery Heritage Fund Grants for Places of Worship grant was awarded in 2017 and project development work got underway in 2019.

The Umbrello is situated near Great Saxham Hall.	Photo provided by Historic England.
The Umbrello is situated near Great Saxham Hall. Photo provided by Historic England.

The Umbrello is an early 19th century structure at the Great Saxham Hall in Great Saxham.

It is made of Coade stone, an artificial stoneware, and it is believed to have been constructed between 1789 and 1813.

The structure itself is in very poor condition and all the roof and roof structure has collapsed and been removed.

Many of the clustered columns have cracks and evidence of cement repairs, and the columns are hollow and the action of ice appears to have broken some of them open.

A programme of photographic recording and building analysis was undertaken by Historic England in 2012 and discussions are underway with the owner's conservation team about repair and re-roofing.

According to a separate 2011 report by English Heritage, the Umbrello 'is in need of urgent attention if it is to survive.'

For more information on Heritage Sites at risk in Suffolk, visit: https://historicengland.org.uk/advice/heritage-at-risk/search-register/results/?searchType=HAR&search=suffolk

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