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Family of Stonham Aspal 27-year-old Jack Last who died after receiving Covid-19 jab instruct law firm in their search for answers



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The family of a Suffolk engineer who died three weeks after being given the AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine have spoken about the 'huge hole in their lives' as they seek answers ahead of potential legal action.

Jack Last, 27, of Stonham Aspal near Stowmarket, died at Addenbrooke's Hospital on April 20 last year from bleeds on the brain after developing a blood clot.

He received the Oxford-AstraZeneca jab on March 30, 2021 in Ipswich and attended A&E at West Suffolk Hospital in Bury St Edmunds about a week later with severe headaches.

Jack Last
Jack Last

His family has instructed clinical negligence specialists at Midlands law firm FBC Manby Bowdler after raising concerns about the circumstances leading to Jack’s death.

Lawyer Michael Portman-Hann, an Associate with FBC Manby Bowdler’s clinical negligence team, said: “Jack’s parents, Mike and Tracy, and his sister Jasmine have all been left bereft by the loss of Jack, whose absence leaves a huge hole in their lives.

“Concerns about the risk of blood clots in under-30s who had the Astra Zeneca vaccine were already being aired in health circles, and just a week after Jack had his vaccine, it was withdrawn from use in this age group.

Jack canyoning in New Zealand
Jack canyoning in New Zealand

“Jack went to West Suffolk A&E with severe headaches and was moved to Addenbrooke's Hospital on April 11 after he started to get a bleed on the brain.

“Due to the family’s concerns about Jack’s treatment after the vaccine, we are supporting them to find some answers.”

Jasmine paid tribute to her 'happy and funny' younger brother.

She said: “Jack had so many more plans and adventures that he had told us about, and we are totally heartbroken that he won’t do any of them.

Jack Last with dad Mike and sister Jasmine
Jack Last with dad Mike and sister Jasmine

“Jack was so happy, all of the time, and he loved everything about life. He was always smiling.

“Jack enjoyed being outdoors, rain or shine. He had an adventurous character – he was a black route skier, and enjoyed walking, hiking and camping.

"He held a private pilot’s licence in both the UK and USA and would often tell us to look out for him as he flew over East Anglia.”

Jack received his US pilot's licence in 2018 and travelled to California where he flew over the Hollywood sign
Jack received his US pilot's licence in 2018 and travelled to California where he flew over the Hollywood sign
Jack in Antarctica visiting penguins
Jack in Antarctica visiting penguins
Jack at Claas with his father Mike
Jack at Claas with his father Mike

After an engineering apprenticeship with agricultural machinery company Claas, during which Jack had spent six months working in New Zealand, he spent six months working for the British Antarctic Survey, driving a traverse across the ice shelf in Antarctica to drop scientific equipment.

At the time of his death, he was working as a construction engineer for Finning CAT.

Jasmine added: “Jack’s happiness and life have been stolen. We miss him so, so much and we need answers.”

A pre-inquest review will be held on August 11.

Following the hearing a full inquest will be listed.