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Dinosaur Walk near Haverhill will raise funds for newly-opened nature reserve



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A group of children is preparing to go back to the time when dinosaurs roamed the Essex and Suffolk border as part of a sponsored walk to raise money for - and increase awareness of - a nature reserve.

The charity expedition takes place tomorrow, when the group of a dozen home educated children will walk from the Noakes Grove nature reserve in Sewards End, near Saffron Walden, to the Kings Field nature reserve in Hempstead, close to Steeple Bumpstead and just a few miles from Haverhill.

Kings Field has just become full open to visitors on foot.

Members of the Wild Child club checking out the route they will be taking on their sponsored walk from Noakes Grove nature reserve to Kings Field nature reserve, near Steeple Bumpstead. Submitted picture
Members of the Wild Child club checking out the route they will be taking on their sponsored walk from Noakes Grove nature reserve to Kings Field nature reserve, near Steeple Bumpstead. Submitted picture

Each millimetre of what has been named The Dinosaur Walk will represent a five year step back in time, and if the entire distance is covered the children will be taken back 65 million years.

Both nature reserves are managed by Walden Countryside, the trading name of the Organic-Countryside Community Interest Company.

David Corke, director of Walden Countryside, explained more: “We are a not-for-profit community interest company dedicated to creating and managing nature reserves in the north Uttlesford area which protect nature, give free access to the public and produce local food using traditional methods - free from artificial chemicals.”

This painting by Essex artist Alan Harris depicts what the county would have been like in Neanderthal times
This painting by Essex artist Alan Harris depicts what the county would have been like in Neanderthal times

Kings Field, added Mr Corke, consists of two large pasture fields, separated by the Bumpstead Brook and grazed sometimes by a small flock of Wiltshire horn sheep and surrounded by ancient hedgerows with a variety of trees and shrubs.

Of the walk, Mr Corke added: “This is to raise funds for our reserves but is also an educational activity for the children.

“They will be imagining the walk is a walk back in time, five years for every millimetre.

“If they complete the walk they will be back with the last dinosaurs and get a real dinosaur tooth prize.”

If you would like to sponsor the children please email dinosaur@walden-countryside.co.uk.