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Linton litter-pick had a wider ecological goal in sight




Volunteers who strive to keep Linton free of litter and prevent it from polluting the village’s river collected a large haul of rubbish during a three-hour clean-up on Sunday.

The litter pick on Sunday, part of the Great British Spring Clean, was organised by the Linton FROG (Linton Friends of the River Granta).

Organiser Helen Brookes, who founded Linton FROG about two years ago, said: “It was very well attended, with more than 40 participants including over a dozen children.

Some of the volunteers at the end of the Linton FROG litter pick. Submitted picture
Some of the volunteers at the end of the Linton FROG litter pick. Submitted picture

“Over about three hours, 14 bags of rubbish were collected from all over the village and beyond, seven of which were bags of recyclable waste.

“We collected 163 plastic bottles, 231 cans, 24 glass bottles, and 41 PPE face coverings.

"These figures are reported back to Rivercare to give an insight into how litter levels and types change over time.

Sheila Price and Janet Hann helping out at the Linton litter pick. Submitted picture
Sheila Price and Janet Hann helping out at the Linton litter pick. Submitted picture

“Other notable finds from the day include a complete wooden toilet seat, a rattan stool, a Thermos flask, one Croc shoe, and an inflatable dinghy.”

Rubbish was also removed from Leadwell Meadows - an area of flood plain at the south end of the village, explained Helen, where years ago people would bathe in the pools created by the meanders of the river.

She added: “It is one of our local beauty spots, and somewhere that Linton FROG hopes to assist Linton Parish Council in maintaining and enhancing for wildlife and for villagers to enjoy.

“We are planning another litter pick in the autumn, to include the areas that were too covered with stinging nettles to pick safely this weekend.”

Leadwell Meadows in Linton getting cleared during the litter pick. Submitted picture
Leadwell Meadows in Linton getting cleared during the litter pick. Submitted picture

Helen set up Linton FROG after becoming annoyed at the amount of litter in and around the river, which is a rare and protected chalk stream (only about 200 or so exist in the world).

She said: “As I had some spare time, I thought I’d look for like-minded folk and set up a group to keep on top of the litter and reduce the amount finding its way into the water and downstream.

Young volunteers Luke and Riley helping out at the Linton litter pick on May 30. Submitted picture
Young volunteers Luke and Riley helping out at the Linton litter pick on May 30. Submitted picture

“And as the river is under threat from over-abstraction of the underground aquifers feeding it (and many other rivers in the Cam catchment area) and is not as healthy as it could be, our group also seeks to help improve the river habitat for wildlife.”

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