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Kedington teenager with learning disabilities left distressed after his car washing business signs were cut down and removed



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A teenager with learning disabilities was left ‘upset and angry’ at what transpired to be the incorrect removal of signs advertising his car washing service.

Jack Hardy, 18, has been offering a car cleaning service from his family home in Dash End Lane, Kedington, near Haverhill for about 18 months.

On the morning of Wednesday, May 4, his dad Richard returned home to find two signs for ‘Jacks Car Wash’ had been removed.

Jack Hardy, 18, has learning difficulties, ADHD and epilepsy, and has a part time car washing business that he runs from home - two signs advertising the business were erroneously removed by the district council. Picture: Mecha Morton
Jack Hardy, 18, has learning difficulties, ADHD and epilepsy, and has a part time car washing business that he runs from home - two signs advertising the business were erroneously removed by the district council. Picture: Mecha Morton

The cable ties had been cut to enable the removal of the signs, one of which was attached to railings on the property.

Jack has learning disabilities, ADHD and epilepsy and, said his dad two days after the incident, ‘only washes about half-a-dozen cars per week to earn a bit of money’.

He added: “He is really upset and angry about it.

Jack Hardy with dad Richard. Picture: Mecha Morton
Jack Hardy with dad Richard. Picture: Mecha Morton

“It is a business he set up for himself and somebody has taken it upon themselves to steal the signs, which he has paid for out of his money and it’s just horrible isn’t it.”

Richard said that although Jack applied for ‘more than 10 jobs every week’ and went on work trials he was unable to secure full-time employment, making the removal of the signs harder to take.

He added: “He wants his self-esteem. He wants to earn his own money and I’m all for it. He’s got a great work ethic.”

Earlier this week, Richard discovered the truth about the signs’ removal, which turned out not to have been a theft but was still distressing for his son.

He said: “It turns out that an anonymous person contacted the (West Suffolk) council Waste and Street Scene team complaining about fly posting.

“It has been acknowledged now that this should have not happened as we had permission to have the advertising signs from the same council.”