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Suffolk's Ed Sheeran tops tax chart, paying more than Queen, Robbie Williams, The Beatles and Adele




Ed Sheeran paid more than £28 million to the taxman in just a year, making him the biggest paying popstar in the country.

The 29 year old, who lives in Framlingham, sent more to the Treasury in 2019 than Queen, Robbie Williams, The Beatles and Adele.

No stranger to clocking the top spot in the charts, the Grammy-winning artist paid more to HM Treasury than any other musician in the UK.

Ed Sheeran, 29, paid more to the Treasury in 2019 than Queen, Robbie Williams, The Beatles and Adele.
Ed Sheeran, 29, paid more to the Treasury in 2019 than Queen, Robbie Williams, The Beatles and Adele.

And writing a £28.2 cheque to the government meant Ed, worth £200m, had the 32nd highest tax bill in the country.

According to the Sunday Times' annual Tax List, the Ipswich Town supporter's company which handles record sales paid £7m in corporation tax.

It also paid him a £10m dividend, liable for £3.8m of tax.

No stranger to clocking the top spot in charts the Grammy-winning artist paid more to HM Treasury than any other musician in the country.
No stranger to clocking the top spot in charts the Grammy-winning artist paid more to HM Treasury than any other musician in the country.

Some £17.4m of his tax bill was accounted for his massively successful world tour - which saw him come to the county - between 2017 and 2019.

Top of the list was Denise, John and Peter Coates, the billionaire owners of Bet365, who paid £573m to the taxman.

Pub landlord Tim Martin, who owns chain JD Wetherspoon, also made an appearance on the list.

Rishi Sunak, Chancellor to the Exchequer, will be hoping big tax cheques keep coming in as the UK's national debt has soared because of the coronavirus pandemic.
Rishi Sunak, Chancellor to the Exchequer, will be hoping big tax cheques keep coming in as the UK's national debt has soared because of the coronavirus pandemic.

He paid £38.6m to the Treasury in 2019, which placed him at number 17 in the annual list.

And the Marshall family, who live just across the border in Cambridgeshire, paid the government £32.1 million in tax.

But alarmingly for the taxman the list, which covers the time before the global pandemic put a sledgehammer through government accounts, showed that the amount of tax taken from the superrich fell.

To make an appearance in the top 50 the wealthy needed to pay £13.1m, a 36 per cent fall from the £20.4m needed the year before.

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