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First coronavirus deaths reported in Suffolk for more than a month in West Suffolk and Ipswich




Two new coronavirus deaths have been recorded, the first fatalities in Suffolk from people with the disease in more than a month.

Latest data released today revealed there has been one death in Ipswich after a positive Covid-19 test within 28 days and one death in West Suffolk.

It is not yet publicly known how old the victims were, nor is it known if they had any other medical conditions.

Two new coronavirus deaths have been recorded, the first fatalities in Suffolk from people with the disease in more than a month.
Two new coronavirus deaths have been recorded, the first fatalities in Suffolk from people with the disease in more than a month.

Before today, deaths were last recorded in Ipswich on the week ending May 14, and in West Suffolk the week of May 28.

No other deaths have been recorded in the county recently. The last time Covid-19 was mentioned on a death certificate in Babergh was on May 14, and in East Suffolk and Mid Suffolk on May 28.

Coronavirus cases continue to rise across Suffolk and England, with warnings the national case load could climb to 100,000 at its peak.

Stuart Keeble, Suffolk's director of public health, has urged people to get both their jabs.
Stuart Keeble, Suffolk's director of public health, has urged people to get both their jabs.

But across the UK coronavirus deaths are 20 times lower than the last time cases rose so high.

In January, when infections last reached 50,000 a day, there were around 600 deaths a day and 3,000 people going into hospital.

But now there are an average of 40 deaths per day and 600 hospital admissions - and experts have said this is thanks to the coronavirus vaccine rollout.

Latest Public Health England data has said two doses of the vaccine are between 92 and 96 per cent effective.

Yesterday, as restrictions were mostly lifted for the first time in more than a year, Suffolk's director of public health urged people to get the jab.

“The key thing people can do to play their part and help society to open up more is to make sure that they are double vaccinated as soon as they become eligible," said Stuart Keeble.

"In Suffolk we are particularly highlighting that a single jab is only half the job – and by getting vaccinated, and testing regularly we can protect those who are more vulnerable."

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