Home   Ipswich   News   Article

Subscribe Now

Stargazers in Suffolk could spot the Orionid meteor shower as it peaks on Wednesday





Stargazers in Suffolk are in with the chance of spotting the annual Orionid meteor shower when it peaks this week.

The meteors fly between October and November and are caused by Earth passing through the stream of debris left behind by Halley's Comet, which is the parent comet of the Orionid shower.

The Orionids, which are set to peak in the early hours of tomorrow morning, "are considered to be one of the most beautiful showers of the year", according to NASA.

Stargazers in Suffolk are in with the chance of spotting the annual Orionid meteor shower when it peaks this week
Stargazers in Suffolk are in with the chance of spotting the annual Orionid meteor shower when it peaks this week

The space agency said the meteors are known for their "brightness and speed" – they travel at about 148,000mph into the Earth's atmosphere.

The Orionids can be seen in both the northern and southern hemispheres during the hours after midnight.

NASA's tips to get a good view of the meteors include finding an area "well away" from city or street lights.

They also recommend lying flat on your back and looking up, taking in "as much of the sky as possible" – your eyes should adapt within 30 minutes in the dark to be able to begin seeing the meteors.

Although the shower peaks tomorrow, astronomers say it is worth keeping an eye out over the nights after as there can be sub-peaks.

Halley's Comet takes around 76 years to orbit the sun once.

The last time it was seen was in 1986 and the next sighting is expected to be in 2061.

Read more: All the latest news from Suffolk