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Suffolk's political map could be redrawn in one of the biggest shake-ups of parliamentary constituencies in decades




Suffolk's MPs could be left fighting amongst themselves before the next election after a radical redrawing of the political map.

The Boundary Commission has proposed the biggest changes to parliamentary constituencies since 1997 as part of a nationwide changing of the map.

Under the initial proposals West Suffolk, represented by Matt Hancock, will be no more with the towns in the area split between two constituencies.

Matt Hancock, photographed in Newmarket, currently represents West Suffolk - but the consistency is set to be abolished with part of it merged into Bury St Edmunds and a Haverhill constituency created.
Matt Hancock, photographed in Newmarket, currently represents West Suffolk - but the consistency is set to be abolished with part of it merged into Bury St Edmunds and a Haverhill constituency created.

Haverhill will be merged with part of the current Braintree seat, creating a new constituency of Haverhill and Halstead - a constituency which will stretch across both Suffolk and Cambridgeshire.

The Bury St Edmunds seat, currently held by Jo Churchill, will become Bury St Edmunds and Newmarket. It will represent the two towns as well as Mildenhall and Brandon.

And a huge North Suffolk constituency will be created, which will represent places like Eye and Framlingham, and will stretch from Halesworth in the east to Ixworth in the west.

Jo Churchil, who represents Bury St Edmunds. Bury St Edmunds will be re-named Newmarket and Bury St Edmunds and stretch west.
Jo Churchil, who represents Bury St Edmunds. Bury St Edmunds will be re-named Newmarket and Bury St Edmunds and stretch west.

The Central Suffolk and North Ipswich seat, currently held by Dr Dan Poutler, will be split into two. One part will be placed into North Suffolk and an area around Ipswich will be merged with Stowmarket to become Ipswich North and Stowmarket.

And as part of the changes Waveney, represented by Peter Aldous, will be removed, but Lowestoft will see its own constituency created.

Ipswich, held by Tom Hunt remains largely unchanged under the proposals, along with South Suffolk, held by James Cartlidge.

The Ipswich seat, currently held by Tom Hunt, will remian largely unchanged . Picture: House of Commons
The Ipswich seat, currently held by Tom Hunt, will remian largely unchanged . Picture: House of Commons

And Suffolk Coastal, represented by employment secretary Therese Coffey, will lose Halesworth, but is set to remain mostly unchanged.

The changes could see Suffolk's MPs, all seven of which are Conservative, fight amongst themselves for their preferred constituency, with their political futures on the line.

Today is the first time anyone outside the Boundary Commission has seen the proposals and what new constituencies would look like.

Dr Dan Poulter, whose Central Suffolk and North Ipswich seat will be split into two.
Dr Dan Poulter, whose Central Suffolk and North Ipswich seat will be split into two.

Across the country most boundaries have changed, with just 10 per cent of existing constituencies remaining unchanged.

Tim Bowden, secretary to the Boundary Commission for England, said: "Each constituency we recommend is required by law to contain between 69,724 and 77,062 electors, meaning there will be significant change to current boundaries.

"We want to hear the views of the public to ensure that we get the new boundaries for Parliamentary constituencies right.”

The commission will present their findings to the House of Commons by July 2023.

The Government was once set to slash the size of parliament down to 600 MPs, but this re-drawing of boundaries keeps 650 MPs returning to Westminster.

The last review of boundaries in Suffolk was in 2010, when the Boundary Commission made mostly minor changes to borders drawn up in 1997.

The biggest change in that review was to transfer one Ipswich Borough Council ward from Central Suffolk and North Ipswich into the constituency of Ipswich.

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