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Rising sea levels could see Ipswich Town Football Club stadium and parts of A14 and Orwell Bridge under water by 2050, scientists warn




Many of Suffolk 's landmarks and tourist attractions could succumb to rising sea levels in the next 30 years, scientists have warned.

Maps created by scientists at Climate Central show what the county's landscape might look like as climate change continues to pose a global threat.

Ness Point

Large areas of Lowestoft are due to be under water by 2050, scientists have warned. Picture: Climate Central (41661268)
Large areas of Lowestoft are due to be under water by 2050, scientists have warned. Picture: Climate Central (41661268)

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Suffolk's coastal towns are among the hardest hit with much of Lowestoft at risk of being under water by 2050.

As well as the town's pier, ferry point and riverside businesses, the most easterly point of England, known as Ness Point, could be gone in 30 years according to scientists.

The site overlooks the North Sea and has a direction marker which shows European countries and their distances from Ness Point.

The beautiful Southwold pier. Image: www.exploresouthwold.co.uk (41661291)
The beautiful Southwold pier. Image: www.exploresouthwold.co.uk (41661291)

Southwold Pier

Southwold's famous pier, which was originally built in 1900, is also among the landmarks due to be lost as a result of rising sea levels.

Over the years, the pier has been damaged by storms and a drifting sea mine and was also partially exploded during the Second World War.

Southwold Railway Trust Steamworks

Southwold will be badly affected by rising sea levels according to scientists. Picture: Climate Central (41661348)
Southwold will be badly affected by rising sea levels according to scientists. Picture: Climate Central (41661348)

The Southwold Railway Trust Steamworks museum, which seeks to preserve the memory of the Southwold Railway which connected the town to Halesworth between 1879 and 1929, faces being wiped out by floods over the next three decades.

Leiston Abbey's original site

In 1363, the site of Leiston Abbey moved further inland after residents became concerned that it was built on swampy, flood-prone land.

Scientists say that almost 700 years later, the residents' fears could become a reality, with the remaining ruins of the abbey's chapels among landmarks due to be lost.

Orwell Bridge with Path. (41661355)
Orwell Bridge with Path. (41661355)

The Scallop

The well-known Scallop monument at Aldeburgh beach, which was unveiled in 2003 as a tribute to composer Benjamin Britten, may also be lost if the scientists' predictions become a reality.

The sculpture, designed by local artist Maggi Hambling, consists of two broken scallop shells with the words 'I hear those voices that will not be drowned' from one of Britten's operas cut into the top.

Cobbold's Point

The point of Felixstowe , which became known as Cobbold's Point after having been bought by John Chevallier Cobbold, is another landmark at risk.

The area is known for its defensive barriers known as groynes, the originals of which lasted for more than 100 years.

The Port of Felixstowe and the town's Languard Fort are also shown as 'at risk' on the map, as well as the town's pier, amusements and fun park.

Suffolk NewsWaterfront IpswichPicture by Mark Westley. (41661411)
Suffolk NewsWaterfront IpswichPicture by Mark Westley. (41661411)

A14 and Orwell Bridge

The parts of the A14 at either side of the Orwell Bridge are also said to be at risk of being wiped out as well as the bridge itself, scientists have said.

The bridge, which takes traffic over the River Orwell, makes up part of the A14 and was opened in 1982.

Ipswich waterfront

Many restaurants and caf├ęs located along Ipswich waterfront will also be lost to floods by 2050 according to the research.

The University of Suffolk and Wolsey Gate are among the buildings which are said to be at risk, with the town's marina expected to be entirely submerged.

Suffolk NewsWaterfront IpswichPicture by Mark Westley. (41661408)
Suffolk NewsWaterfront IpswichPicture by Mark Westley. (41661408)

Portman Road

Fans of Ipswich Town Football Club will be sad to learn that the club's stadium and surrounding streets are also said to be on limited time.

The stadium has been the club's home since 1884; its stands and surrounding streets named after the club's former managers Sir Bobby Ronson and Sir Alfred Ramsey.

The nearby Ipswich Crown Court and Endeavour House, the headquarters of Suffolk County Council, will also be wiped out according to the map.

Suffolk NewsPortman Road IpswichPicture by Mark Westley. (41661414)
Suffolk NewsPortman Road IpswichPicture by Mark Westley. (41661414)

West Suffolk

Large parts of Lakenheath, Mildenhall and Brandon will also be lost to rising sea levels, according to Climate Central.

Parts of RAF Lakenheath, including the passenger runway, will be under water by 2050, with the majority of Brandon's High Street also due to be lost to the sea.

Land in and around Mildenhall, West Row and Beck Row have also been highlighted on the map, with Mildenhall's speedway stadium at risk of being swamped.

SPEEDWAY at Mildenhall stadium. (41661481)
SPEEDWAY at Mildenhall stadium. (41661481)

Areas over the border in Cambridgeshire, such as Soham near Newmarket, will also be up against rising sea levels in 30 years.

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