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Plans for nine-bedroom HMO for asylum seekers in London Road South, Lowestoft, which received over 20 objections from public refused





Plans for a nine-bedroom house of multiple occupation (HMO) for asylum seekers in a coastal town have been refused.

Lowestoft Town Council and 23 members of the public objected to the proposals for 47 London Road South, which were rejected by East Suffolk Council on Monday.

A delegated report said the building appeared to be used as an unlicensed seven-bedroom HMO at present and raised concerns that further conversions in the Flat Saturation Zone would result in ‘further amenity impacts to residents’.

Plans for a nine-bedroom HMO at 47 London Road North, Lowestoft, pictured centre, have been rejected by East Suffolk Council. Picture: Google Maps
Plans for a nine-bedroom HMO at 47 London Road North, Lowestoft, pictured centre, have been rejected by East Suffolk Council. Picture: Google Maps

The property is situated between a residential property to its left and Deerheart Collective tattoo shop and East Coast Cinema to its right.

Planners mentioned the potential impact of increased on street parking, bin storage issues and heightened levels of activity and disturbance.

Applicant Patrice Elonge proposed that, if the application was approved, the property would be handed over to Serco to manage after development had finished.

The report said plans did not demonstrate how the needs of the vulnerable tenants would be met and how issues such as anti-social behaviour, safeguarding and emergencies would be dealt with on a day-to-day basis.

It also said there was a lack of detail regarding the number of tenants, duration of occupancies and how the property would be managed.

The report raised issues about how the letting of nine bedrooms, which could see upwards of 11 people occupying the premises, would be handled.

Lowestoft Town Council recommended the application for refusal due to the ‘potential disorder and harm to the occupants in relation to them being targeted’.

It added that councillors held concerns over a perceived lack of consultation made with nearby residents and building works being ‘out-of-character’ in a conservation area.

Public objections to the proposals cited a need for one and two bedroom housing in Waveney, the proposals being demoralising for those trying to ‘make Kirkley a better place to live’ and the demand for spacious housing in the area being unmet.