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Eighty years after her death the grave of a pioneering Newmarket woman racehorse trainer has finally been marked with a headstone





Nearly eighty years after her death, the grave of pioneering trainer Ellen Chaloner has finally been marked with a headstone.

The first woman to be granted a trainer’s permit by the Jockey Club, Ellen had lain in an unmarked grave in Newmarket cemetery since her death at the age of 98, in 1944.

Now her final resting place in a quiet corner of the graveyard has a headstone as does that of her husband, Tom, himself a classic winning jockey, and trainer, who lies beside her.

Members of the family of Ellen Chaloner gathered at Newmarket cemetery where her grave, and that of her husband, have finally been marked with headstones
Members of the family of Ellen Chaloner gathered at Newmarket cemetery where her grave, and that of her husband, have finally been marked with headstones

Ellen’s story was first told in the Journal in 2016 when it was seen by Marietta Krikhaar, her great granddaughter, who took up the case of her ancestor and rallied other members of her family including Ellen’s great great grandson, former Irish champion jump jockey, Charlie Swan behind the project.

Their fundraising campaign was supported by the Jockey Club who also named a race to be run at the Rowley Mile on 2,000 Guineas day every year in Ellen’s memory.

Her headstone bears an image sourced for the family, by the Journal, of Ellen riding out on Newmarket Heath, which also now hangs in the Jockey Club Rooms in Newmarket.