Home   Newmarket   News   Article

Newmarket murder trial jury retires to consider its verdict after weeks of evidence into the death of mother-of-two Clare Nash




The jury set to determine whether or not a Newmarket man is guilty of murdering a mother-of-two has retired to consider its verdict.

Charles Jessop, 29, is on trial at Ipswich Crown Court and is accused of murdering Clare Nash at her Brickfields Avenue home on January 16 last year.

Judge Martyn Levett delivered his summing up today, and went through the key points of the arguments presented by both Mark Cotter, prosecuting, and Keir Monteith, defence.

Police officers standing guard outside the Newmarket home of Clare Nash on January 17 last year.
Police officers standing guard outside the Newmarket home of Clare Nash on January 17 last year.

After the panel of six men and six women left the courtroom to begin their deliberations, and are set to consider weeks of evidence in order to reach their verdict.

Jessop has denied murdering the 33 year old, the court heard, but has admitted to her manslaughter.

Jessop has claimed at the time of Miss Nash's killing anti-depressant Citalopram had affected his state of mind.

Floral tributes left for Clare Nash in Brickfields Avenue, Newmarket, after he death.
Floral tributes left for Clare Nash in Brickfields Avenue, Newmarket, after he death.

Miss Nash was stabbed and then strangled by Jessop after she arrived home on the night of January 16, the court was told during the trial.

Standing in the witness box, Jessop told the jury on the night of Miss Nash's death he could see a lifeline and stars as if he was in the computer game Grand Theft Auto, and he laid in wait for her near her Studlands Park house because when he arrived she was not in.

The prosecution have said he did not reference the game in his initial police interviews or at the time of his arrest.

Clare Nash was found by emergency services at her Brickfields Avenue home on January 16 2020 after she had been stabbed and strangled.
Clare Nash was found by emergency services at her Brickfields Avenue home on January 16 2020 after she had been stabbed and strangled.

During the attack Jessop stabbed her, the court was told, but Miss Nash then entered the downstairs bathroom. He followed her, and continued to stab her. When the kitchen knife he took from his home broke, he then strangled her, the court heard.

Jessop said he thought she was looking for a gun that he told the jury she had shown him a couple of months earlier.

The jury also heard extensive evidence from Dr Nat Cary, one of Britain's leading forensic pathologists, who went through the numerous injuries Miss Nash had sustained.

Dr Cary said Miss Nash had a number of deep wounds to her body, including a number of injuries which suggested she had tried to defend herself during the attack.

He said she had also been strangled, and that he could not conclude if her death was caused by strangulation or stab wounds.

And during the trial the jury heard expert evidence as to the affect of Citalopram on Jessop's mind, which the jury must also consider when coming to its conclusion.

The court was also told about his past convictions, both when he was prescribed the anti-depressant and when he was not.

For information on how we can report on court proceedings, click here

Read more: All the latest news from Suffolk

Read more: All the latest news from Newmarket