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Newmarket trainers hope for solution to horse manure collection crisis





A solution may be in sight for Newmarket trainers unable to dispose of hundreds of tons of their horses' used bedding after the sudden closure of a manure collection and recycling business.

West Row-based Alwyn Moss, whose firm had provided the service to trainers, studs and other equine sites in the area for the past 40 years sent an email to clients informing them he would cease trading on September 29, a decision affecting about 20 trainers including Marco Botti, Godolphin, Gay Kelleway, Jon Scargill and John Ryan.

Mr Botti said: “We were given very short notice and we've been left in the lurch.

West Row-based Alwyn Moss, whose firm had provided the service to trainers, studs and other equine sites in the Newmarket area for the past 40 years sent an email to clients informing them he would cease trading on September 29, a decision affecting about 20 trainers including Marco Botti, Godolphin, Gay Kelleway, Jon Scargill and John Ryan. Picture: Mark Westley
West Row-based Alwyn Moss, whose firm had provided the service to trainers, studs and other equine sites in the Newmarket area for the past 40 years sent an email to clients informing them he would cease trading on September 29, a decision affecting about 20 trainers including Marco Botti, Godolphin, Gay Kelleway, Jon Scargill and John Ryan. Picture: Mark Westley

“We tried to make a few phone calls last week but there's only one other company you can deal with and when I rang them they said the only ones they were taking on were the vets.”

Seventy-five-year-old Mr Moss had cited a lack of good drivers, problems with disposal and his own advancing years for the decision to shut down operations.

But earlier this week, he told the Journal that he was in negotiations with another company which could see collections from his beleaguered former customers starting up again before long.

“They are keen to take over and run my business as soon as we can reach an agreement and get it signed,” he said.

Meanwhile, Jockey Club Estates managing director Nick Patton said they were trying to come to the aid of trainers on a temporary basis.

“It's not strictly a Jockey Club issue, but we're exploring ways we can help out with storage while things settle down,” said Mr Patton.

Mr Moss said he had not been considering retiring but the increasing difficulty of hiring good drivers had forced his hand.

“For this job you need the best drivers because they are operating cranes around horses worth millions of pounds,” said Mr Moss.