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Six Suffolk pubs with unusual names, including The Unruly Pig in Bromeswell



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The British pub is a staple part of our culture - especially during the cold winter months in front of a warm fire.

They are the central piece of every village or town across the country, and in Suffolk it is no different.

In our county there are hundreds of pubs, all appealing to punters in their own way.

The Unruly pig is regarded as one of the best pubs in Suffolk. Picture: Google Maps
The Unruly pig is regarded as one of the best pubs in Suffolk. Picture: Google Maps

Some of them have more unusual names than others, and here we have taken a look at some of the strangest.

To help with our search, a pub is defined as a place where people go to drink and meet their friends.

Have we missed any? Let us know in the comments.

The Swan and Hedgehog Inn, Ipswich. Picture: Google Maps
The Swan and Hedgehog Inn, Ipswich. Picture: Google Maps

1. Swan and Hedgehog Inn, Ipswich

These are two animals that you would not place together in any normal day scenario.

Located in the centre of Ipswich in King Street, it is one of the town's most ancient inns. According to research, it is one of just 24 to have appeared on an assessment of the town in the 17th century.

A date on the wall of the pub, 1707, is believed to reference the first time major alterations were made.

It is stated that in the middle part of the 19th century, the pub was known as The White Swan.

The Grade II listed pub was taken over in 2019, when the name changed to the one it possesses today.

The Bird in Hand, Beck Row. Picture: Google Maps
The Bird in Hand, Beck Row. Picture: Google Maps

2. Bird in Hand, Beck Row

A peculiar name, compared to some of the more popular pub monikers, there are only a handful with this name in the country.

The origin of the Bird in Hand is believed to come from Henry VIII's love of falconry when he was king.

Despite the current building dating back to the 1930s, it is believed that a pub has been on the site for much longer, with the previous premises having been knocked down.

One of the first landlords of the pub is believed to be Robert Hills, who served as a farmer and innkeeper in the middle of the 1800s.

Today it is owned by Greene King.

The Black Tiles in Martlesham. Picture: Google Maps
The Black Tiles in Martlesham. Picture: Google Maps

3. Black Tiles, Martlesham

There is an interesting back story behind the Black Tiles in Martlesham.

The pub was first built as a stopping place and tearoom for businesswoman, Miss F.E. Jermyn.

The Jermyn family are a noble family with a long history. Sir Thomas Jermyn was an English politician, whose seat in parliament was Rushbrooke Hall near Bury St Edmunds.

According to their website, during the Second World War the former tearoom was used by people at RAF Martlesham to escape the stress of war.

It was only in 1970 that the building was converted into a pub.

The Punch Bowl Inn, Cotton. Picture: Google Maps
The Punch Bowl Inn, Cotton. Picture: Google Maps

4. Punch Bowl Inn, Batttisford

Much like the Black Tiles in Martlesham, there is also an interesting and unique history story surrounding the Punch Bowl Inn.

The Battisford tavern was the first community-owned pub to open in the county, having returned under new ownership in 2011.

However, there is believed to have been a pub on the site for much longer, with records showing that one was listed in the 1860s, although it was then considered to be under nearby Combs.

The name has a political inspiration as it is believed to have originated from the preferred drink of Whigs - a former political party - as they liked to drink punch, whereas their Conservative opposition drunk wine.

The Trowel and Hammer, Cotton. Picture: Google Maps
The Trowel and Hammer, Cotton. Picture: Google Maps

5. Trowel & Hammer, Cotton

This pub is the centre of Cotton in Mid Suffolk.

First built in the 14th century, the Trowel & Hammer has been the hub of life in the village ever since.

Originally, the pub opened as a beerhouse, meaning that they could not sell spirits at first.

Details surrounding the origins of the name are scarce, but it can only be imagined that there are just a handful of pubs with similar names.

The Trowel & Hammer in Cotton. Picture: Google Maps
The Trowel & Hammer in Cotton. Picture: Google Maps

6. The Unruly Pig, Bromeswell

Named one of the best pubs in the country in this year's Great British Pub Awards and the Best Suffolk Restaurant for 2018/19, The Unruly Pig stands out in name and for its food.

The pub has had a number of names throughout its history, including the Cherry Tree up until the start of last decade.

It had previously been known as the Cherry Tree, having been first been recognised in documents in 1758.

Now, the pub is one of the most successful in the county, and has a 4.5 star rating out of five on TripAdvisor.