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End of an era for Roundabout parish magazine as editor stands down from role after 40 years



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HITCHAM.Uphill, The Causeway, Hitcham.A monthly parish magazine has closed after publishing its last edition. .Editor David Turner, 81, is standing down, after 40 years of working on the Roundabout magazine. Picture by Mark Westley. (5801398)
HITCHAM.Uphill, The Causeway, Hitcham.A monthly parish magazine has closed after publishing its last edition. .Editor David Turner, 81, is standing down, after 40 years of working on the Roundabout magazine. Picture by Mark Westley. (5801398)

A long-standing parish magazine, which provided news and events to more than a dozen villages for nearly 50 years, has seen its last edition published.

David Turner, 81, of The Causeway, Hitcham, has worked on the Roundabout for 40 years, but is standing down as editor due to the commitments involved in its production.

A notice was placed in the monthly magazine, which is distributed to 13 villages for a yearly subscription of £3.50, earlier this year, notifying readers of the vacant post following his retirement, but no-one has come forward, meaning that the magazine has ceased publication.

“People don’t do this sort of thing now,” said Mr Turner, who attributed the lack of interest to a change in technology.

“It’s probably down to social media; people don’t want parish magazines – it’s a sign of the times,” he said.

HITCHAM.Uphill, The Causeway, Hitcham.A monthly parish magazine has closed after publishing its last edition. .Editor David Turner, 81, is standing down, after 40 years of working on the Roundabout magazine. Picture by Mark Westley. (5801396)
HITCHAM.Uphill, The Causeway, Hitcham.A monthly parish magazine has closed after publishing its last edition. .Editor David Turner, 81, is standing down, after 40 years of working on the Roundabout magazine. Picture by Mark Westley. (5801396)

Mr Turner highlighted that the loss of the publication will impact on dedicated readers.

“People will grumble because they will want to look at the magazine to see which events are taking place in their local communities, but it won’t be there any more,” he said.

Mr Turner, who is a former teacher at a school for children with learning difficulties, said he would like to see the publication continue and involve a range of age groups in its production, but he is doubtful that it will appeal to the younger generation.

“I think it’s a matter of what people are prepared to do,” he said. “I don’t think anyone my age is interested, and others prefer their mobile phones.”