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First exhibition at Mill Tye Gallery in Great Cornard since start of Covid-19 pandemic refreshed with new artwork following early success




The early success of a Great Cornard gallery’s first exhibition since the Covid-19 pandemic began has resulted in new work being added to the show, which runs until the end of the month.

The ‘Principally Trees’ exhibition at Mill Tye Gallery in Cornard Mills has been refreshed with eight new framed prints, following several picture sales during a busy period for the show in July.

Featuring 25 years of work by Sudbury artist Noel Myles, many of which have been drawn from the local area, the showcase began earlier this summer after the gallery returned from lockdown.

Noel Myles with fresh images at the Principally Trees exhibition, taking place at the Mill Tye Gallery in Great Cornard. Picture by Jackie Mellor. (50035772)
Noel Myles with fresh images at the Principally Trees exhibition, taking place at the Mill Tye Gallery in Great Cornard. Picture by Jackie Mellor. (50035772)

The new pictures include Fir Forest, a palladium print made in 1999 from a photo of a French forest, and Large Cornwall, an original composition made from photos taken in Land’s End.

Owner Peter Rumsey said the display had enjoyed a strong response, but, with visitor numbers slowing down in recent weeks, he hopes the addition of new images would give people a new reason to come along.

“We have rehung the exhibition to make it fresh for people,” he told the Free Press. “Even those who came at the start will find new pictures.

“The response has been really good. A lot of visitors could relate to the images of the work and they found it really interesting. Because a lot of pictures are from the local area, people have been saying, ‘I know that tree’, so overall, it has been very positive.”

Mill Tye Gallery is open on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, while the exhibition’s final day will be on Bank Holiday Monday, from 11am to 4pm, with Noel on hand to answer questions about his work.

Entry is free. To learn more, click here.