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Mill Tye Gallery in Great Cornard urges public to help aspiring artists fulfil potential after reopening following coronavirus lockdown




The owner of an art gallery in Great Cornard is encouraging the public to pledge their support to the venue to help young artists fulfil their potential.

Mill Tye Gallery in Cornard Mills reopened last month, after the Government instructed that all museums and art venues should close in March to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

Highlighting the impact that the crisis has had on budding artists, gallery owner Peter Rumsey said: “It was difficult enough for young artists to find outlets for their work and to make a livelihood before coronavirus, but it’s just become much harder now.”

The Mill Tye Gallery recently reopened to the public and is encouraging people to pledge their support to budding artists by visiting the venue...Pictured: Artist Dominic Upson and gallery owner Peter Ramsey ....PICTURE: Mecha Morton. (39823693)
The Mill Tye Gallery recently reopened to the public and is encouraging people to pledge their support to budding artists by visiting the venue...Pictured: Artist Dominic Upson and gallery owner Peter Ramsey ....PICTURE: Mecha Morton. (39823693)

Reflecting on the importance of providing a stimulating space for artists to showcase their skills, Mr Rumsey said: “The future of the arts in this country lies with young people; they need platforms for their work.

“Without the opportunity to exhibit and sell their work, they have no future.

The gallery is currently staging a summer exhibition featuring a range of printmaking projects and one-off pieces of pottery.

The Mill Tye Gallery recently reopened to the public and is encouraging people to pledge their support to budding artists by visiting the venue...Pictured: Gallery owner Peter Ramsey ....PICTURE: Mecha Morton. (39823699)
The Mill Tye Gallery recently reopened to the public and is encouraging people to pledge their support to budding artists by visiting the venue...Pictured: Gallery owner Peter Ramsey ....PICTURE: Mecha Morton. (39823699)

Other creations on show include abstract print designs by Sudbury artist Noel Myles, whose work is inspired by Holy Trinity Church in Long Melford.

A 10 per cent donation from each piece of Mr Myles’ work will go towards the church’s medieval stained glass fund, which was launched earlier this year to restore eight of its windows.

Encouraging people to take an active interest in the work of newly established artists, Mr Rumsey added: “Visiting the gallery will provide a huge boost; your support will help nurture their potential and help to ensure that the country isn’t deprived of the amazing talent we have in the region.

“The power of art is unrivalled in history and our mission is to continue to share it. We are delighted to welcome people back through our doors.”

The summer exhibition is open on Saturdays and Sundays, between 11am and 4pm.