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Robin is the talk of the classroom at Nayland Primary School after surprise arrival over Easter holidays



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The unexpected arrival of a robin has caused quite a stir at a Suffolk school, which has turned the surprise visitor into an exciting learning experience.

The Eagles class at Nayland Primary School were surprised to find, upon their return from the Easter holidays, the bird had built a nest on one of the displays inside their classroom, using a non-functioning window to enter and exit the building freely.

Staff found what they believe to be one hatched and three unhatched eggs and, after seeking advice from wildlife services, they were advised to leave the nest in place.

Nayland Primary School, Bear Street, Nayland, Suffolk. Eagles class at Nayland Primary School has been looking after a robin which unexpectedly built a nest inside their classroom after getting inside through an open window during the Easter holidays. eagle pupils Daisy Hotchkiss and Sophia Stehle with class mates. Picture by Mark Westley. (56447556)
Nayland Primary School, Bear Street, Nayland, Suffolk. Eagles class at Nayland Primary School has been looking after a robin which unexpectedly built a nest inside their classroom after getting inside through an open window during the Easter holidays. eagle pupils Daisy Hotchkiss and Sophia Stehle with class mates. Picture by Mark Westley. (56447556)

Under the Wildlife and Countryside Act, nests cannot be moved while they are being built or remain in use, apart from in a small number of exceptional circumstances.

Class teacher Katie Coburn, who is also Nayland Primary’s deputy headteacher, explained that, while the situation was unintentional, they have sought to turn it into a positive by incorporating the robin’s presence into the children’s learning.

“The children are very excited,” she told the Free Press. “We have regularly spotted the robin flying into the classroom to deliver worms and twigs to the nest.

“At first, we considered moving the nest, but we did some research and spoke to Suffolk and Essex Small Animal Welfare, and we were told it would disturb them if we moved it, so we left it as is.

“The children named the robin Twiggy and we spent an afternoon learning about robins. We’re using it in our maths, English and science lessons to support our learning.”

Mrs Coburn said the pupils have also been busy filling up bird feeders and placing them around the school grounds in expectation that the remaining eggs will hatch in the near future.

“We hope all the chicks hatch,” she added. “The advice we’ve been given is to keep the windows open as much as possible, because they need to learn to fly.

“It’s usually three weeks before they leave the nest, so we want to make the most of it while the robins are still here.”