Home   Sudbury   News   Article

Subscribe Now

Sudbury woman with multiple sclerosis ticks off bucket list with sponsored indoor skydive in aid of MS-UK



More news, no ads

LEARN MORE


After living with multiple sclerosis (MS) for three decades, Sudbury resident Karen Turner said a skydive had always been on her bucket list of activities to experience.

However, as her condition declined in recent years, requiring use of a wheelchair due to her limited mobility, she feared the window of opportunity had passed.

But, on Saturday, the dream became a reality for the 56-year-old, after she teamed up with MS-UK to experience a specially-adapted indoor skydive at iFly in Milton Keynes, raising more than £1,300 for the charity in the process.

Karen Turner, who has multiple sclerosis, has raised money for the MS-UK charity with a sponsored indoor skydive. Picture: Mecha Morton
Karen Turner, who has multiple sclerosis, has raised money for the MS-UK charity with a sponsored indoor skydive. Picture: Mecha Morton

“I don’t think they’ve done this before, so I’m sort of the guinea pig,” Karen told SuffolkNews.

“The charity is making it possible to have a go at experiencing the sheer adrenaline and the feeling of a skydive. It’s really great, because it’s so inclusive.

“Part of being disabled is the frustration of not being able to just do the things everybody else does.

Her condition declined in recent years, requiring use of a wheelchair. Picture: Mecha Morton
Her condition declined in recent years, requiring use of a wheelchair. Picture: Mecha Morton

“MS-UK helps you make choices to be included. I still want to be included in activities that would be considered normal, and a skydive was always on my bucket list.”

Now medically retired, Karen has set out to explore new hobbies to demonstrate that MS should not be a barrier to the activities that the majority of people are able to enjoy.

She also wants to spread awareness of the work of MS-UK and other organisations, highlighting both the ongoing medical research and the support services that are available for people with the condition.

“Hopefully, there will be a cure in my lifetime,” she added. “I’ve got to keep up the fight and keep raising money for the charities that are doing something to help as many people as they can.

“I’ve got a very good circle of friends and family, and the power of Facebook has been brilliant as well. Far and wide, people have been spreading the word.

“I’m 56 now, but I was diagnosed when I was 26. I’ve now lived with MS longer than I did without it.

“There’s a list of things you have to adapt to but, because of that, I don’t feel like I’m missing out on things. Now it’s about raising money for the charities that help other people.

“They do an amazing job, but because of the Covid pandemic, people couldn’t fund-raise as much as they did before.”