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"Little scribbled verses" see Harleston man best thousands of entrants to win art award




A 78-year-old has beaten thousands of entrants to win a national arts competition which was launched in March to encourage artistic creativity among older people.

David Bramhall, who lives in Harleston , took first place in the poetry category of the competition, named King Lear Prizes, with a poem inspired by his experience performing and conducting at Snape Maltings concert hall in Suffolk.

He said: “Very few people read the books I write, although those who do are polite. On the other hand, no one reads my poetry at all. I could hardly pass up the opportunity to reach a wider audience, and to see if my verse is actually any good.

Harleston, Norfolk, 21/10/2020..David Bramhall has beaten a field of thousands of entries to win an art competition set up for elderly people to encourage creativity in older age. He wrote about his experiences as a musician and conductor in Snape Music Hall to win the poetry section of the competition...Picture: Mark Bullimore Photography. (42802702)
Harleston, Norfolk, 21/10/2020..David Bramhall has beaten a field of thousands of entries to win an art competition set up for elderly people to encourage creativity in older age. He wrote about his experiences as a musician and conductor in Snape Music Hall to win the poetry section of the competition...Picture: Mark Bullimore Photography. (42802702)

He added: “This is going to make a big difference to me. Although I write prose continually, I have never taken very seriously the little verses I scribble from time to time and certainly never thought of myself as a poet. To have one of these scribblings singled out for such distinction is going to change my attitude entirely - perhaps I’m better than I thought?”

There were 15,000 entries across six categories in the competition, from people across the UK and British citizens overseas.

Mr Bramhall spent most of his working life as a musician and music teacher, and has also worked as a conductor, arranger and choir-trainer.

Since retiring, he has shifted his focus from music to writing, and has self-published a number of non-fiction books, novels and short stories.

For his winning poem “Snape Maltings, the concert hall late at night” he collected £1,000 in prize money.

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