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There’s been enough negativity, says Greig Young, who puts a positive spin on how we can ring in the new year in style




Start off by buying a lovely duck! It makes a massive difference. Carefully remove the breasts and legs. Reserve the carcass for stock if you wish. Remove the skin from the breasts and legs. Cut each breast into 3 strips and refrigerate. De-bone the legs and dice up the meat. Add the diced leg meat to the pork mince along with the diced pork fat, shallots, and egg. Give it a good pinch of salt, a good mix and set it aside in the fridge chill.

Cut the gherkins into quarters long ways and reserve. Prepare a pan of boiling water and add a good amount of salt. Trim your leeks to the length of your terrine mould and cook in the boiling water until tender (approximately 2 minutes) then cool in iced water or under some cold running water. This will help keep them nice and green.

Line your terrine mould with cling film and then with streaky bacon. If you don’t have a terrine mould, use a loaf tin or even a cake tin, don’t be scared to be a bit creative. Leave an overlap of around an inch on each side. Now our moulds are set, we are ready to assemble!

Duck terrine (43670628)
Duck terrine (43670628)

This is the fun part; layer it all up, alternating the mince mix, the duck strips, and the gherkins. My main advice would be to just have fun. Don’t be scared to over fill it as we will press it down later. Fold the bacon over the top (as much as you can) and wrap the whole thing tight in cling film, then in tinfoil. Set your oven to 145 degrees and place a big oven tray in there that can hold your terrine mould comfortably. Put your terrine in and put water in the tray, like a bain-marie, which will help keep an even cooking temperature. Cook for an hour and a half then remove in the tray. Let stand for a further 30 minutes. Remove your terrine carefully and using trays or plates put them on top to press it down and refrigerate. Leave in the fridge overnight and slice up and enjoy with pickles and toast!

STARTER: DUCK TERRINE (MAKES 1)

Ingredients:

1 whole duck

300g minced pork belly

150g diced pork fat

6 gherkins

2 leeks

4 shallots (finely diced and sweated in a teaspoon of oil and a teaspoon of curry powder)

1 egg

12 rashers of good streaky bacon or pancetta

Pickles and toast to serve

Method:

Start off by buying a lovely duck! It makes a massive difference. Carefully remove the breasts and legs. Reserve the carcass for stock if you wish. Remove the skin from the breasts and legs. Cut each breast into 3 strips and refrigerate. De-bone the legs and dice up the meat. Add the diced leg meat to the pork mince along with the diced pork fat, shallots, and egg. Give it a good pinch of salt, a good mix and set it aside in the fridge chill.

Cut the gherkins into quarters long ways and reserve. Prepare a pan of boiling water and add a good amount of salt. Trim your leeks to the length of your terrine mould and cook in the boiling water until tender (approximately 2 minutes) then cool in iced water or under some cold running water. This will help keep them nice and green.

Line your terrine mould with cling film and then with streaky bacon. If you don’t have a terrine mould, use a loaf tin or even a cake tin, don’t be scared to be a bit creative. Leave an overlap of around an inch on each side. Now our moulds are set, we are ready to assemble!

This is the fun part; layer it all up, alternating the mince mix, the duck strips, and the gherkins. My main advice would be to just have fun. Don’t be scared to over fill it as we will press it down later. Fold the bacon over the top (as much as you can) and wrap the whole thing tight in cling film, then in tinfoil. Set your oven to 145 degrees and place a big oven tray in there that can hold your terrine mould comfortably. Put your terrine in and put water in the tray, like a bain-marie, which will help keep an even cooking temperature. Cook for an hour and a half then remove in the tray. Let stand for a further 30 minutes. Remove your terrine carefully and using trays or plates put them on top to press it down and refrigerate. Leave in the fridge overnight and slice up and enjoy with pickles and toast!

MAIN:

Steak top tips!

There’s something really nice about cooking a chunky big cut steak to share with a loved one.

My top tips are:

Buy the best you can from a good local butcher and buy a good size (800g to a kilo). My favourite is sirloin on the bone but you could go for a cote de beuf or T-bone.

I always like to cook my steaks on the bone, they are more forgiving to cook and a much tastier product.

Let it come to room temperature before you cook it and let it rest before you eat it!

I always scratch the surface with a fork to help the caramelization and

give it a good season with Maldon salt.

For a 900g to 1kg sirloin, I generally colour both sides in a pan and put it in a preheated oven at 180 for 6 minutes on each side and let rest on a cooling rack for at least 8 minutes

Enjoy with a good wine and company!

Frangipane Tart (43670633)
Frangipane Tart (43670633)

DESSERT: FRANGIPANE TART

Ingredients:

125g ground almonds

22g flour

125g butter

125g sugar

75g egg

50g sourdough starter (if it survived since lockdown 1)

Pre-rolled pastry (it is just easier)

Strawberry jam (or leftover Christmas pudding is nice)

Method:

This is a super simple one, and like all my favourite recipes it’s easily adapted. The sourdough starter will bring a bit of tang, but if you do not have it, do not worry. The filling is up to you. Any nice jam would be great! If you have some boozy mincemeat leftover or some preserved cranberry, even better.

Let your butter come to room temperature and beat in a mixer with a paddle. Add the dry ingredients and mix for a minute. Turn up the speed and add the eggs slowly followed by the sourdough if you have it. Put in the fridge for an hour to chill.

I like to use individual tart cases, but a big one will work fine.

I find the best way is to line the tart cases with the pastry and put a good amount of the filling on the bottom and fill with the frangipane mix. You will get the best result if you do not pre-bake your pastry. I cook them at a low temperature of 140 degrees in a fan oven. Small ones will take about 35 minutes and the big ones just a tad over an hour. They will be a lovely golden brown when ready and if you insert a metal skewer, it should come out clean. Let the little ones sit for about 10 minutes before tucking in with custard and a scoop of ice cream.

Greig Young is head chef at The Northgate, Northgate Street, Bury St Edmunds

Call 01284 339604

See thenorthgate.com